In Memory

Glenn Lemmer

Glenn Lemmer and his father were killed in a car accident on May 17, 1984.

 


Glenn T. Lemmer, age 25, husband of Angela (Kubik), son of Kathleen (Jerry) and the late James, Sr., brother of James, Jr., Leonard, Jean Snodgrass, Rita Babera, Toni and Uncle.  Funeral service Friday, May 25 at 11 a.m. at BAKER FUNERAL HOME, BEREA.  Burial Brooklyn Heights Cemetery.  VISITING HOURS THURSDAY 7-9 P.M.

(Published in the Plain Dealer, Wednesday, May 23, 1984)


Our thanks go out to Gretchen White for locating this newspaper article. 

 

Five Truck Accident Kills Two

United Press International

  SEYMOUR, Ind. -- A father and son were killed and five people injured in a firey accident involving five semi rigs and a car that blocked Interstate 65 in southern Indiana for more than 12 hours.

  By early afternoon Friday I65 northbound still remained blocked from the 11:30 p.m. Thursday accident.  Southbound lanes were cleared once emergency vehicles moved off the scene on I65, the main road linking Indianapolis and Louisville.  For some hours, 26 miles of interstate were closed, with U.S. 31 used as an alternate route.

  The dead victims were identified as Glenn T. Lemmer and his father, James, both of Blountville, Tenn.  Their truck burst into flames along with the semi that barrelled across the median and hit it headon.

  A pair of good Samaritans kept the death toll from being higher, state police said.  They said emergency medical technicians Bob and Betty Palma, Grand Rapids, Mich., arrived at the scene minutes after the accident.  They freed and treated occupants of the car crushed by one of the trucks.

  State police planned to plot the accident as exactly as possible, but tentatively gave this sequence of events:

  They said a southbound truck driven by Russell Whaling, of Kokomo, hit the rear of an empty tanker semi.  The tanker driver drove off apparently unharmed and with minor damage to his truck, but Whaling's truck hurtled into the northbound lane and hit the Lemmers' truck.

  The impact hurled Whaling clear.  He suffered a broken pelvis and some cuts.

  Christine Evans, 31, Kirkland, slowed her car to avoid the wreckage, but the car was struck from behind by a North American Van Lines truck carrying computer equipment and personal belongings.

(Published in the Times Daily, May 19, 1984)